Saturday, May 8, 2010

Are you a paragon of pedagogical prodigiousness? Or do you settle?

Do you settle for sensible solutions for our people and our times? Are you sharing knowledge to build stronger fishnets, improved plows, and better yeos?

Or do you hear the trumpet fanfare as you perpetuate your Noble (or mobile) kingdom of learning in your role as the Laudatory Lord or Leading Lady of Learning and as paragons of pedagogical prodigiousness?

For those who know me...the 21st century label, title, category sticks in my craw but I adapt, implement, and overcome (AIO). I came across this book in the recommended readings for my account, 21st Century Skills: Learning for Life in Our Times in Books 24x7 through AKO (What is Army Knowledge Online?). 21st Century Skills: Learning for Life in Our Times is also available with a limited preview through Google Books.

While there are many interesting points in the book, the sidebar of the novel, The Once and the Future King caught my attention in the Kingdom of Learnalot, Kingdom of Learning, Software & Hardware Guilds, Sir Ludd & the Luddites, Laudatory Lord & Leading Lady of Learning, Paragons of Pedagogical Prodigiousness and King Wallace's closing statement, “‘Tis time to return to your plans my dearest—stronger fishnets for the fishermen, improved plows for the plowmen, better yeos for the yeomen— sensible solutions for our people and our times.

Chapter 4: Digital Literacy Skills—Info-Savvy, Media-Fluent, Tech-Tuned opens with this quote, "It is no longer enough simply to read and write. Our children must learn how to spot a stereotype, isolate a social cliché, and distinguish facts from propaganda, analysis from banter, and important news from coverage". —Ernest Boyer, past president, Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching


Read The Once and the Future on beginning on page 62 





As the story ends:
King Wallace turned to his Queen. “Alas, my Lady, you were right all along. We are not in the least ready for the great Knowledge Age or the noble Learning Society.

“‘Tis time to return to your plans my dearest—stronger fishnets for the fishermen, improved plows for the plowmen, better yeos for the yeomen— sensible solutions for our people and our times."

“Perhaps, my dear, one fine day in the far-off future, there will come a time when learning is truly king.”
“And queen,” added Her Highness.

Do you settle for sensible solutions for our people and our times? Are you sharing knowledge to build stronger fishnets, improved plows, and better yeos?

Or do you hear the trumpet fanfare as you perpetuate your Noble (or mobile) kingdom of learning in your role as the Laudatory Lord or Leading Lady of Learning and as paragons of pedagogical prodigiousness?

Comments, recommendations, and/or checks in the reaction box are always welcome.




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